Marine navy – US Submarine http://us-submarine.com/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 20:09:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://us-submarine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-28T233436.077-150x150.png Marine navy – US Submarine http://us-submarine.com/ 32 32 Fame Academia: Merchant Navy and Navy Veterinarian “Still Waiting for His Check” http://us-submarine.com/fame-academia-merchant-navy-and-navy-veterinarian-still-waiting-for-his-check/ http://us-submarine.com/fame-academia-merchant-navy-and-navy-veterinarian-still-waiting-for-his-check/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/fame-academia-merchant-navy-and-navy-veterinarian-still-waiting-for-his-check/ Veteran Fame Academia and daughter Lynnette pose for a photo during WWII weekend at the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum. (credit Anthony C. Hayes) READING, PA. – When war broke out in 1941 between the United States and the Empire of Japan, many young Americans responded to their country’s call by enlisting in the armed forces. 14-year-old […]]]>

Veteran Fame Academia and daughter Lynnette pose for a photo during WWII weekend at the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum. (credit Anthony C. Hayes)

READING, PA. – When war broke out in 1941 between the United States and the Empire of Japan, many young Americans responded to their country’s call by enlisting in the armed forces. 14-year-old Fame Academia’s initial response was to finish school. But a beating by a Japanese interrogator prompted Fame to support a guerrilla war that would thwart Japan’s onerous occupation of its Filipino homeland. When the war ended, Fame would be at sea aboard an ocean-going tug as an enlisted member of the United States Merchant Navy.

We met Fame and his daughter Lynnette last Saturday over WWII weekend at the Mid-Atlantic Air Museum. Lynnette – who lives in the nearby town of Downingtown, PA. – had heard of the annual event in Reading and thought his father would like to see the sights and connect with some of his fellow veterans.

“My father has so many stories about his time in service, from his enlistment in the Merchant Navy to his entry into the navy in the Korean War, Vietnam and his ten-year service under Admiral Moorer. I wanted to bring it here, but we didn’t know this event was so big! That’s wonderful.

Fame’s memories of his service began with his first encounter with the Japanese and his eventual enlistment in the Merchant Navy.

Veteran Fame J. Academia. (credit Anthony C. Hayes)

“I was just a teenager when the war started. Too young for the army, so I continued in school while secretly supporting the guerrillas. My father and I were both severely beaten by a Japanese interrogator. When MacArthur arrived I went to Manila to join the service I could. An American colonel – I don’t remember his name – sent me from Manila to Subic Bay to join the Merchant Navy and help with the overhaul of a tug that was being sent to Mindanao. But when we finally got off we went to the Solomon Islands to help remove a stuck freighter that was loaded with tanks and ammunition. “

Fame’s service during World War II often led him into danger. He also placed it near the Okinawa coast in 1945, where women threw their children off the cliffs – then jumped to their deaths – to avoid being captured by US forces.

Fame Academia remained in the Merchant Navy for seven years, then joined the US Navy during the Korean War, serving aboard LSMs and destroyers. His service aboard a ship during an engagement along the Korean coast earned him a Purple Heart and, over time, a chance to see defeat in the eyes of some of his enemy fighters.

“We were sent by NATO to pick up around 130 Chinese who had surrendered and said they did not want to fight in Korea anymore. But the LSM was too big, so we got on my old tug. Once we secured the men under the bridge, we were told to deliver these prisoners of war to the Chinese coast. But the enemy was still in the area, so we had to navigate at night under cover of darkness. We had sailed from Manila in Korea, to the coast of mainland China where we released the prisoners of war, then returned to Manila, with no identification and no lights on. But no one told us when we started who we were going to look for or where we were going to take them. “

Fame told us he enjoyed his time at sea and especially his service under Admiral Moorer. He also said he was sorry that he was unable to attend the funeral of the late Chief of Staff.

During our brief conversation, Fame repeatedly said that he had never been paid for his wartime service. “I think they must have misspelled my name when I enlisted.”

General MacArthur, left, congratulates Captain Villamor (one of the small groups of pilots who rendered heroic service in the battle) of the Philippine Air Force, after awarding him the Distinguished Service Cross on December 22, 1941. (Library of Congress).

General MacArthur, left, congratulates Captain Villamor of the Philippine Air Force after awarding him the Distinguished Service Cross, December 22, 1941. (Library of Congress.)

We joked that his check was probably lost in the mail or stashed safely in the pocket of the late Admiral Moorer’s coat. But a review of the historical records revealed what appears to be worrying confirmation of Fame’s claim.

In the 1944 GI Bill of Rights, Allied fighters from 66 countries were included as beneficiaries of some of the best care that country could offer. Only the men and women of the Philippines – who were promised official recognition for their service at the start of the war – were deliberately excluded from American largesse.

Subsequent post-war legislation, known as the Rescission Act of 1946, in part provided that the service of Filipinos: “shall not be considered to be or to have been service in the military or national forces of the United States. United States or any part of it or any United States law conferring any rights, privileges or benefits.

Filipino veterans will eventually gain citizenship through the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965. And legislation pushed by former Rep. Colleen Hanabusa (D-HI) has led to Filipino veterans being recognized with the law. on the World War II Filipino Veterans Congress Gold Medal. .

Otherwise, the immeasurable role played by Filipino veterans in winning the war in the Pacific remains largely forgotten.

Hailing from the Philippines, Merchant Marine and US Navy Veteran Fame Academia has a chest full of medals. But since last Saturday, the old sailor is still waiting for his check from Uncle Sam.

“Give me ten thousand Filipinos and I’ll take over the world!” “

General Douglas MacArthur

Reenactor Alexandra Pinamonti stops to greet veterans Victor Marulli and Fame Academia.  (credit Anthony C. Hayes)

Reenactor Alexandra Pinamonti stops to greet veterans Victor Marulli and Fame Academia.
(credit Anthony C. Hayes)

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Northrop Grumman Tests MQ-8C Expeditionary Controls for Marine and Naval Missions http://us-submarine.com/northrop-grumman-tests-mq-8c-expeditionary-controls-for-marine-and-naval-missions/ http://us-submarine.com/northrop-grumman-tests-mq-8c-expeditionary-controls-for-marine-and-naval-missions/#respond Tue, 25 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/northrop-grumman-tests-mq-8c-expeditionary-controls-for-marine-and-naval-missions/ Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 1 (VX-1) officials analyze the diagnostics of the MQ-8C Fire Scout on the flight deck of the Independence variant littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) on June 21, 2018 US Navy photo Northrop Grumman is testing a portable expeditionary control station that could help Sailors and Marines operate the […]]]>

Air Test and Evaluation Squadron 1 (VX-1) officials analyze the diagnostics of the MQ-8C Fire Scout on the flight deck of the Independence variant littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4) on June 21, 2018 US Navy photo

Northrop Grumman is testing a portable expeditionary control station that could help Sailors and Marines operate the Navy’s unmanned helicopter both at sea and ashore.

The contractor is currently testing his Expeditionary Mission Control Station (MCS-X) on the Navy’s MQ-8C Fire Scout, Lance Eischeid, Northrop Grumman’s program director for Fire Scout, told USNI News.

“We also have a control station that we have developed which is an expeditionary control station, which allows it to be packaged and unloaded on other ships or taken ashore – on an island, if you will. , and lets you operate Fire Scout not just from a single ship. You can move it anywhere you want, “he added.” So that’s really reflected in their distributed maritime operations and in these sets. expeditionary type missions, and we’re piloting that right now – flying with this control station on a test site now and maturing it to be ready for operations for years to come.

This type of mobile control station would allow Sailors and Marines to easily take the system apart and take it with them when needed.

“It takes all of the functionality of the current Fire Scout control system – which is usually found in a CONEX box or it’s hard-mounted in the ship – and repackages it in small portable boxes, rugged boxes, which can be quickly installed. demolished and really set up in various places, ”Eischeid said.

Northrop recently confirmed that the MQ-8C could be installed aboard the amphibious transport dock USS Anchoring (LPD-23). During the adjustment, I checked what kind of communications equipment he would need to use the MCS-X with the amphibious ship.

“When we met the ship it was clear that they wanted organic [intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance] capabilities, which we currently have. We can give them that today. So that would definitely be a big help for this class. But as they reach weapons and surface missiles. . . Fire Scout can also play a key role in these targeting missions, ”Eischeid told USNI News, referring to LPDs.

Officials discussed the possibility of placing missile launchers on LPDs, which were not built with vertical launch system cells. Placing the naval strike missile on LPDs was offered as an option, but former Chief of the Naval Operations Staff (OPNAV N95) Chief of Staff’s Expeditionary War Director Major General Tracy King earlier suggested this year that could be difficult to continue because the Navy is putting NSMs on littoral combat ships.

The mobility of the control station could also align with the Marine Corps’ vision for Forward Expeditionary Base Operations (EABO), which would see Marines move between islands in the Pacific to support the naval fleet.

“It depends on the needs. We’ll have to work with the Marines on their specific needs, but I would say we are – the fact that we’re already flying with, we’d just need to tailor their specific needs. I would say that we are in the final stages of being able to provide full capability, ”said Eischeid when asked about a potential timeline for delivering that capability to the Marine Corps if the service so wished.

The MQ-8C is larger than its predecessor, the MQ-8B, which operates from Navy Littoral combat ships and has been used on both frigates and destroyers. Eischeid said the C variant almost tripled the payload capacity compared to the B and also has a higher endurance level.

“It has newer components and the design has higher reliability, so from that point of view, it offers these additional benefits. Because we are now putting a newer radar system into it compared to the B – so it’s going to have a better and more capable radar system that will be deployed with it here shortly, ”he said. “It also operates a system called Minotaur, which is used by a number of Navy platforms for the command and control of different sensors. So those are the current benefits, but we certainly have a number of other payloads and new capabilities in the pipeline that we are actively working on that will bring even more capabilities to it.

An MQ-8C Fire Scout passes the initial fit check aboard the USS Anchorage (LPD-23) at Naval Station San Diego, Calif., May 24, 2021. Northrop Grumman Photo

The new radar system is Leonardo’s Osprey 30 Active Electronically Scanned Array (AESA) radar and the UAV will also feature the Link 16 data link, USNI News previously reported.

In addition to the new systems, the MQ-8C variant will have a new interface for its control station

“It’s an improved interface – a little bit more – easier to use and user-friendly, if you will. And it has commonalities with other Navy systems, ”Eischeid said, noting that the interface is also used on the P-8A Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft.

USNI News previously reported that Northrop offered the MQ-8C as an option for the Navy to conduct anti-submarine warfare missions.

Meanwhile, the service is still looking for a way forward for UAVs after abandoning its initial plans to rapidly expand the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) ​​Expeditionary Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) program, or MUX.

“I can’t speak for the Marines except I think we can definitely support these sets of missions, you certainly know with the [electronic support measures] system that we are putting in place that will support early warning and targeting capabilities, ”Eischeid said when asked if the MQ-8C could help meet the Marine Corps’ desire for airborne early warning capabilities . “So certainly I think we are in a good position to support these missions. Absoutely.”

The MQ-8C is expected to deploy for the first time later this year.


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Navy and Navy Amphibious Ready Group returns from deployment amid fatal shipwreck investigation last summer http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-amphibious-ready-group-returns-from-deployment-amid-fatal-shipwreck-investigation-last-summer/ http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-amphibious-ready-group-returns-from-deployment-amid-fatal-shipwreck-investigation-last-summer/#respond Fri, 21 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-amphibious-ready-group-returns-from-deployment-amid-fatal-shipwreck-investigation-last-summer/ CAMP PENDLETON – After a seven-month deployment to the Middle East and Africa, the more than 5,000 Marines and Sailors of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit began disembarking at Camp Pendleton on Friday, the Marines said in a statement. The MEU includes the San Diego-based Makin Island amphibious assault ship and the Somerset and San […]]]>

After a seven-month deployment to the Middle East and Africa, the more than 5,000 Marines and Sailors of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit began disembarking at Camp Pendleton on Friday, the Marines said in a statement.

The MEU includes the San Diego-based Makin Island amphibious assault ship and the Somerset and San Diego amphibious transport docks. Sailors and Marines deployed in November.

The unit supported the withdrawal of US troops from Somalia as well as operations in Iraq and Syria. Following its combat support and training missions, the unit traveled to Alaska this month to participate in a joint training exercise, which means the unit has moved from the hot, desert climates of the Persian Gulf with cold arctic waters.

“The 15th MEU and ARG from Makin Island deployed during an unprecedented pandemic and demonstrated the ability of the Navy and Marine Corps team to safely and successfully conduct operations in a COVID-19 environment, “said Colonel Fridrik Fridriksson, commander of the MEU. , in a report. “I am incredibly proud of the professionalism, tenacity and mental resilience displayed by our Marines and Sailors.”

The months leading up to the deployment were marked by disaster.

The unit was training for a deployment near San Clemente Island in July when a Marines’ amphibious assault vehicle suffered a series of catastrophic mechanical failures and sank, killing nine young servicemen. A Marine Corps investigation found that the unit’s AAVs were in poor condition and should not have been in the water that day. In addition, the Marines and sailors of the battalion landing team were not properly trained in water evacuations.

Colonel Christopher Bronzi, the commander of the 15th MEU, was dismissed from his post in March following the investigation. His relief followed that of Lt. Col. Michael Regner, who was fired as the commander of the 1/4 Battalion Landing Team last year.

The Marines opened another investigation in April to focus on training the 15th MEU after outcry from family members of some servicemen killed in the crash. Marine Expeditionary Units consist of Marines from different commands, such as Infantry, Air Force, and Supply, who come together to train and deploy. The investigation examines the impact of training and material readiness on unit training, the Marines said.

Major-General Robert Castellvi, the former commanding general of Camp Pendleton-based 1st Marine Division tasked with training the MEU, has been suspended from his new position as Corps Inspector General this month pending the results of the last survey.


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Navy and Navy officials seek to improve safety culture following fatal AAV crash last year http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-officials-seek-to-improve-safety-culture-following-fatal-aav-crash-last-year/ http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-officials-seek-to-improve-safety-culture-following-fatal-aav-crash-last-year/#respond Mon, 03 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-officials-seek-to-improve-safety-culture-following-fatal-aav-crash-last-year/ U.S. Marines drive amphibious assault vehicles through waves during training at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 14, 2020. Marines from Camp Pendleton were back in the ocean with AAVs this week . (Brendan Mullin / United States Marine Corps) WASHINGTON – Officials from the Marine Corps and Navy told House lawmakers on Monday […]]]>

U.S. Marines drive amphibious assault vehicles through waves during training at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, Calif., July 14, 2020. Marines from Camp Pendleton were back in the ocean with AAVs this week . (Brendan Mullin / United States Marine Corps)

WASHINGTON – Officials from the Marine Corps and Navy told House lawmakers on Monday they were looking for ways to create a culture of safety after an amphibious assault vehicle sank that killed nine servicemen l ‘last year.

“The sinking of this AAV and the deaths of eight Marines and one sailor were preventable. Avoidable in many ways. But we failed, ”General Gary Thomas, Deputy Commander of the Marine Corps, told members of a House Armed Services Committee subcommittee.

A “confluence of human and mechanical failures” caused the sinking of the AAV off the coast of California in July, according to a nearly 2,000-page internal investigation released in March that found the fatal training accident was preventable.

The unit’s vehicles were in “horrible condition” and 12 out of 13 were unusable when they should have been ready for land and sea operations, the investigation concluded.

Thomas and other military officials spoke at the hearing about lessons learned from the investigation, how to reduce the risk of preventable accidents and create a culture of safety within the Marine Corps and the Marine.

“If we can, with our education system, our reporting systems, create an environment where people are comfortable, I think we will make a lot of progress towards the culture of safety that we need,” he said. he declares.

This includes researching how to instill in leaders the importance of monitoring, identifying risks, shutting down operations, and rewarding hazard reporting.

The nine service members, part of the 1/4 Battalion Landing Team of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, drowned as their AAV sank during a pre-deployment training exercise.

The AAV was returning to the USS Somerset when the vehicle began to take on water. The investigation revealed that there were no suitable safety boats on the water. He also discovered that the crash was caused by a sequence of mechanical failures, a communication failure inside the AAV, and an interruption in training.

Eleven members of the Marine Corps in the chain of command have so far been sanctioned for their role in the crash. Review boards are still considering whether the majority of them should be separated from the service, Thomas said. Some have had less discipline against them, he said.

Last month, Thomas also asked Lt. Gen. Carl Mundy III to conduct a new investigation into the training of the Marine Expeditionary Unit, including training and readiness monitoring. It is not known on Monday what led to the last investigation.

He said all Marines should be empowered to “assess risk and speak up when they see something dangerous.” Commanders must also foster an environment that rewards hazard reporting in order to enhance the overall safety culture of the service.

“Historically, the Marine Corps has had a culture of instinctively providing relief to everyone after an incident or disaster, without analyzing individual command responsibilities. … Obviously, there was an oversight that should have happened, both with regard to [coronavirus] This AAV battalion’s basic training or surveillance schedules, ”said Representative Seth Moulton, D-Mass., a Marine Corps veteran who has flown four missions in Iraq.

The investigation found that some leaders correctly reported training and equipment gaps, but those reports were ignored or the leaders were punished for raising concerns up the chain of command.

The Marine Corps made a series of recommendations in the aftermath of the crash after the investigation was released in March, which includes reviewing the effectiveness of lifejackets, underwater evacuation training and the use of safety boats during waterway operations.

In coordination with the Navy, recommendations include a review of standard operating procedures for AAV operations and the amphibious combat vehicle program to ensure that lessons learned from AAV accidents are incorporated into training and operations.

Representative John Garamendi, chairman of the House Armed Services Committee readiness subgroup, criticized the Marine Corps recommendations, citing the lack of a way for the military to “sound the alarm and call timeout “.

He said 137 Marines have died in various accidents over the past decade and 60 members in the past five years.

“Clearly, [pausing the exercise] could and should have happened in this tragedy, but it did not happen, ”Garamendi said.

To encourage this action, Thomas said the Marine Corps is looking to add additional security specialists to ensure the security of the exercises and establish more adequate security protocols.

“In all the exercises that we do every day in the Marine Corps, every exercise at some point, the Marines get up and shut down operations, and that’s exactly what we have to do in this case, that’s it. that we have failed, ”he said. .

The Navy, comprising a panel of 16 subject matter experts within and outside the two services, is conducting a separate investigation into the incident. It will provide conclusions on planning, Navy and Marine Corps integration, as well as training and operational safety.

This investigation is expected within 30 days, said Vice-Admiral Roy Kitchener, Commander of Naval Surface Forces. The Navy has not resumed waterborne AAV operations since a post-crash safety hiatus.

The investigation will also examine what actions and decisions Navy personnel took that day that could have contributed to the accident, and what policies and practices are needed or need improvement, among others.

“I am working deliberately and urgently with my Marine Corps counterpart to review all integrated Navy and Marine Corps operations to ensure that our operational procedures are aligned, including a common policy on the use of safety boats and clear lines of authority during training evolutions, ”Kitchener said.

A subsequent investigation of the AAVs directly after the accident revealed that the majority of vehicles had failed inspection and should not be used. The mechanics who had inspected the vehicles returned them, up to code for land operations, but not maritime operations.

“We had an issue across the fleet with our seal integrity. Some 54% of the vehicles inspected had failures in the sealing integrity of their plenum doors, i.e. the large air intakes at the front, to allow air to enter. ‘Getting in and out of an engine underwater,’ said Maj. Gen. Gregg P. Olson, director of personnel for the Marine Corps.

Olson said he has updated manuals and instructions to ensure vehicles are inspected to the highest level of detail necessary to determine deviations in vehicle safety for both types of operations.

Rep. Mike Johnson, R-La., Asked Thomas what the process is to ensure that changes and recommendations issued as a result of the investigation are incorporated into service policy and doctrine.

Thomas said a watchdog group, led by a general officer, is reviewing the recommendations and these people are leading briefings on progress until action is complete. Part of this also includes providing an action plan to Congress.

Garamendi said the House subcommittee intended to hold another follow-up hearing in about six months to ensure the recommendations were implemented.

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Stars and Stripes – Navy and Navy bases in Japan fight new coronavirus infections as cases rise in Tokyo http://us-submarine.com/stars-and-stripes-navy-and-navy-bases-in-japan-fight-new-coronavirus-infections-as-cases-rise-in-tokyo/ http://us-submarine.com/stars-and-stripes-navy-and-navy-bases-in-japan-fight-new-coronavirus-infections-as-cases-rise-in-tokyo/#respond Thu, 09 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/stars-and-stripes-navy-and-navy-bases-in-japan-fight-new-coronavirus-infections-as-cases-rise-in-tokyo/ A Sailor stands behind a social distancing marker as he lines up at the exchange at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, April 7, 2020 (Kindo Go / US Marine Corps) Stars and Stripes is making stories about the coronavirus pandemic available for free. See other free reports here. Sign up for our daily coronavirus newsletter here. Thank […]]]>

A Sailor stands behind a social distancing marker as he lines up at the exchange at Camp Hansen, Okinawa, April 7, 2020 (Kindo Go / US Marine Corps)

Stars and Stripes is making stories about the coronavirus pandemic available for free. See other free reports here. Sign up for our daily coronavirus newsletter here. Thank you for supporting our journalism with a subscription.

CAMP FOSTER, Okinawa – The Japanese Navy and Marine Corps moved on Thursday to isolate and monitor coronavirus cases that have emerged at their facilities in Okinawa and just outside Tokyo.

Meanwhile, the governor of Tokyo on Thursday reported 224 new infections in the metropolitan area, an increase that surpassed the previous record of 206 on April 17.

For the second time this week, an undisclosed number of people associated with the Marine Corps in Okinawa have tested positive for the virus, adding to the number of cases there, according to a press release Thursday from Marine Corps Installations Pacific.

The Atsugi Naval Air Facility, south of Tokyo in Kanagawa Prefecture, also “discovered a few cases” of the coronavirus on Thursday, prompting base commander Captain Lloyd Mack to order a lockdown at 2:45 p.m., said Thursday by phone a spokesperson for the Navy.

“Just to protect the community and make sure we are preventing the spread, the skipper chose to take shelter in place during the investigation,” said spokesperson Howard Samuelson.

In Tokyo, the 224 new cases are the highest daily number since the outbreak began, Governor Yuriko Koike said at a meeting of the city’s coronavirus response headquarters. Tokyo is generally off limits to US troops, civilian Defense Department employees, and their families.

In Okinawa, the Marines on Thursday did not say how many people tested positive, only that they fell under the status of forces agreement and were at facilities that make up the Corps’ sprawling base camp. Marines Smedley D. Butler.

On March 27, Defense Secretary Mark Esper ordered commanders to stop reporting new cases of coronavirus at their facilities, citing security concerns. The policy is not uniformly respected.

Camp Hansen was closed overnight from 10:43 p.m. Wednesday to 9:22 a.m. Thursday to allow for contact tracing and cleanup, according to the Navy statement Thursday.

It did not specifically link Hansen to the new coronavirus cases. Those infected have been quarantined, the statement said.

However, the Okinawa Defense Office is collecting information on Japanese employees at Hansen and Marine Corps Air Station Futenma who may have been in contact with affected U.S. personnel, according to an office spokesperson.

Government spokespersons in Japan frequently speak anonymously as a condition of their employment.

Movements of the latest cases are being tracked to determine if they have had contact with locals, an Okinawa Prefecture spokesperson told Stars and Stripes on Thursday.

MCAS Futenma was locked up for four hours on Tuesday after “several” people there tested positive for the coronavirus; these individuals were also isolated, according to the Marines.

“These measures are put in place to ensure the safety and well-being of our forces, our families and our neighbors in Okinawa,” the statement said on Thursday. “We are taking all measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19”, the respiratory disease caused by the coronavirus.

For now, U.S. bases in Okinawa remain under Bravo health protection, signaling a “moderate” risk of the coronavirus spreading, Navy spokesman 1st Lt. Tim Hayes told Stars and Stripes.

The Marines will not make any further statements to the media on the new cases of the coronavirus, according to the statement on Thursday, in accordance with Esper’s instructions “and to protect the privacy of those affected by COVID-19.”

On Wednesday, the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare had counted 20,371 cases of coronavirus and 981 deaths.

On Wednesday, Okinawa confirmed its first positive case of the coronavirus in its population since April 30, a man in his 40s who had visited the main islands of Japan.

The Okinawa Times reported that the island confirmed another off-base case on Thursday. A woman in her 20s from Tokyo tested positive while traveling to Okinawa.

The prefectural government reported two cases on Wednesday, each having contracted the virus outside of Okinawa, the newspaper reported.

Stars and Stripes reporters Hana Kusumoto and Seth Robson contributed to this report.

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Senior Navy, Navy and Coast Guard Officers Speak About Coronavirus at San Diego Conference http://us-submarine.com/senior-navy-navy-and-coast-guard-officers-speak-about-coronavirus-at-san-diego-conference/ http://us-submarine.com/senior-navy-navy-and-coast-guard-officers-speak-about-coronavirus-at-san-diego-conference/#respond Mon, 02 Mar 2020 08:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/senior-navy-navy-and-coast-guard-officers-speak-about-coronavirus-at-san-diego-conference/ SAN DIEGO – So far, the spread of the Covid-19 coronavirus has not affected military readiness, according to senior officers from the U.S. Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps who spoke at the of a WEST 2020 conference in San Diego on Monday. Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday, Marine Corps Command General David […]]]>

So far, the spread of the Covid-19 coronavirus has not affected military readiness, according to senior officers from the U.S. Coast Guard, Navy and Marine Corps who spoke at the of a WEST 2020 conference in San Diego on Monday.

Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Gilday, Marine Corps Command General David Berger and Coast Guard Commander Adm. Karl Schultz have each played down the effect of the virus on their services after an Army soldier stationed in Korea became the first US serviceman to test positive for the virus last week.

Gilday, Berger and Schultz each said no member of the service in their branches has yet tested positive for the virus. An army spokesperson confirmed that the soldier was the only soldier to have tested positive on Monday.

However, the spread of contagion is having an effect on operations, the chiefs said.

“The coronavirus itself manifests itself in different ways,” Gilday said. “What we see in the fighter’s commands is a variety of steps (to mitigate the effect). We have banned travel to northern Italy due to the concentration of the epidemic there. Same thing in some places in Asia.

Gilday said the Navy was scrutinizing port visits for its ships and cutting back on some naval exercises. He did not mention any specific port or vessel, but did say that sailors are checked on the comings and goings of ships in port.

“We test the crews before they disembark (and) test the crews before they return,” said Gilday. “We have trained our medical staff to be able to identify symptoms, test, then isolate, quarantine, until you confirm whether or not this is an active case.”

Schultz said the Coast Guard is helping screen commercial vessels coming to the United States for signs of the virus.

“We work with the shippers, we work with the crew members,” he said.

Berger said the Marines had cut back on exercises in Asia, but the Corps had not been affected otherwise.

“So far not a big impact,” Berger said. He said US bases, including Marine Corps station Miramar, reacted well when tasked with housing quarantined US citizens who were evacuated from Wuhan, China, in February.

WEST is a large naval conference held annually in San Diego. It attracts the best military and defense contractors to the San Diego Convention Center and continues through Tuesday.


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Navy: Navy SEALs who declared their leader to be “liars” http://us-submarine.com/navy-navy-seals-who-declared-their-leader-to-be-liars/ http://us-submarine.com/navy-navy-seals-who-declared-their-leader-to-be-liars/#respond Thu, 27 Jun 2019 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/navy-navy-seals-who-declared-their-leader-to-be-liars/ SAN DIEGO – A Marine Staff Sergeant said Thursday that a Navy SEAL chief accused of murder, Edward R. Gallagher, failed to stab an injured teenage ISIS fighter in Iraq. He said the SEALs who testified differently were lying. Giorgio Kirylo, currently attached to the 1st Marine Raiders Support Battalion at Camp Pendleton, spoke during […]]]>

A Marine Staff Sergeant said Thursday that a Navy SEAL chief accused of murder, Edward R. Gallagher, failed to stab an injured teenage ISIS fighter in Iraq. He said the SEALs who testified differently were lying.

Giorgio Kirylo, currently attached to the 1st Marine Raiders Support Battalion at Camp Pendleton, spoke during the second day of defense testimony before Gallagher’s court martial at Naval Base San Diego.

Kirylo said that in the spring and summer of 2017, he was attached to the SEALs to provide battlefield intelligence as the platoon helped Iraqi forces fight to retake Mosul from the Islamic State.

He said he had become close to members of Gallagher’s platoon, but the accusations against Gallagher have since separated them.

Gallagher, 40, is charged with premeditated murder in connection with the alleged stabbing of the injured fighter. He is also accused of shooting civilians and indiscriminately shooting other non-combatants while deployed to Iraq.

Gallagher denies all charges and has pleaded not guilty.

Several members of Gallagher’s platoon brought war crimes charges shortly after the platoon returned from Iraq in September 2017. Two of them testified at the trial only after Iraqi forces brought in the fighter. ISIS wounded at SEALs for medical treatment, they saw Gallagher stab the fighter in the neck.

Kirylo, the Marine, said he was part of a “slut circle” of SEALs who frequently complained about Gallagher and his battlefield tactics, such as using his men as bait to lure. ISIS operatives.

Kirylo said in May 2017 that he had identified the building targeted by an airstrike. He said he was at the scene when the ISIS fighter injured in the strike was brought to the SEALs.

Kirylo said it was his voice the jury heard on a short video of the fighter’s arrival.

Kirylo said in the video, “Eddie is going to kick him out, man.”

A prosecution lawyer tried to ask Kirylo what he meant; was it in response to something that several other witnesses said they heard Gallagher say on the radio, “No one is touching him; he is mine.”

But Kirylo said he hadn’t heard Gallagher say that. He did not explain further.

Kirylo testified that a SEAL medic, Petty Officer 1st Class Terence “TC” Byrne, injected something into the fighter’s arm, then leaned over Kirylo and said, “This guy is going to feel everything we do. let’s do.

He said SEAL medics, including Gallagher, treated the fighter until he died of his injuries. Kirylo said he and many of the peloton then posed for “trophy photos”.

He said he looked under a bandage on the right side of the fighter’s neck – a bandage according to prosecutors covered the stab wounds – and saw no blood or wounds.

Lt. Scott McDonald, a Navy prosecutor, challenged Kirylo’s account during cross-examination, asking him why he had not come forward after Gallagher’s arrest.

“Didn’t it occur to you to tell NCIS that you looked under the bandage and didn’t see the stabbing?” McDonald asked.

Kirylo did not respond, but later said he feared a reaction from his chain of command and didn’t think investigators would believe him.

Kirylo also disputed other charges against Gallagher.

Some SEAL Platoon snipers said Gallagher shot an old man and young girl from sniper towers just east of the Tigris.

Kirylo said he always accompanied the SEALs on these tours. He was carrying classified material and working with a linguist to keep SEALs informed of nearby IS movements.

Kirylo said he had never seen Gallagher shoot civilians from these towers.

He said ISIS would use women to transport ammunition and that male fighters would often disguise themselves as women. He said most of the platoon shot women during this deployment.

The Marine also said he remained close to some SEALs after deployment and described Byrne as his “best friend” and an “absolute brother”.

Kirylo said the friendship ended “once (Byrne) started lying … about his conduct that day”.

In a video released during the trial, Byrne is seen operating a drone on the body of the dead fighter.

Kirylo said the platoon was happy after the fighter’s death because the successful airstrike – which he said wiped out an ISIS commander – was a big victory.

Kirylo said he was no longer friends with Chief Special Warfare Operator Craig Miller, who testified that he saw Gallagher stab the fighter.

“He’s a liar,” Kirylo said of Miller.

Kirylo said he entered a platoon reunion later the same day the fighter died.

Miller, along with other prosecution witnesses, said the meeting was about Gallagher stabbing the fighter.

Kirylo said it wasn’t true. Miller ordered the men to delete the photos the platoon had taken with the fighter’s body.

Jurors also heard video testimony from Iraqi Major General Abbas al-Jubouri, head of the Iraqi Emergency Response Division, who worked with Gallagher’s platoon during the deployment. Abbas said he brought the injured fighter to the SEAL compound and stayed with him until his death.

He said Gallagher had never stabbed him.

The last defense witness on Thursday was Dr. Gregory Schmunk, chief medical examiner for Polk County, Iowa.

Schmunk said there was no way to determine the injured fighter’s cause of death as there was no physical evidence to examine, just photos of the body and a bandage covering part of his neck.

Schmunk suggested that because the bandage did not appear to be soaked in blood, it could mean there was no stabbing. However, during cross-examination, he also said that if the bandage was applied after the fighter’s death, there would be no blood on it.

Defense attorneys said they wanted to call Lt. Cmdr. Robert Breisch Friday morning. Breisch received a “target letter” last month informing him that he was under investigation for a possible attempt to cover up war crimes.

The defense requested immunity from testimony. It is not known if the Navy will grant it.

Defense lawyers have also requested the immunity of Lieutenant Jacob Portier and would like him to testify. Doorman is billed separately as part of the deal.

A Navy spokesperson said Thursday he could not say whether Breisch or Portier would receive immunity.

Gallagher’s trial is expected to last until next week.


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Memorial plaque dedicated to the fallen Navy, Navy Cross recipient Donald Hogan, on the anniversary of his death in Afghanistan – Orange County Register http://us-submarine.com/memorial-plaque-dedicated-to-the-fallen-navy-navy-cross-recipient-donald-hogan-on-the-anniversary-of-his-death-in-afghanistan-orange-county-register/ http://us-submarine.com/memorial-plaque-dedicated-to-the-fallen-navy-navy-cross-recipient-donald-hogan-on-the-anniversary-of-his-death-in-afghanistan-orange-county-register/#respond Tue, 28 Aug 2018 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/memorial-plaque-dedicated-to-the-fallen-navy-navy-cross-recipient-donald-hogan-on-the-anniversary-of-his-death-in-afghanistan-orange-county-register/ COSTA MESA – August 26, 2009 changed Carla and Jim Hogan’s lives forever. It was on this day that their 20-year-old son, Lance Cpl. Donald Hogan, a Marine with the 1st Battalion / 5th Marines at Camp Pendleton, was killed in Nawa, Afghanistan, when a roadside bomb exploded. “It had an impact on our family […]]]>

COSTA MESA – August 26, 2009 changed Carla and Jim Hogan’s lives forever.

It was on this day that their 20-year-old son, Lance Cpl. Donald Hogan, a Marine with the 1st Battalion / 5th Marines at Camp Pendleton, was killed in Nawa, Afghanistan, when a roadside bomb exploded.

“It had an impact on our family and the direction our lives would take,” said Jim Hogan, 62, of San Clemente. “It really changed everything.”

On Sunday, nine years to the day of Donald Hogan’s death, a bronze memorial – an exact replica of a Navy Cross quote – was unveiled in a ceremony at Heroes Hall in Costa Mesa. The Hall, on the OC Fairgrounds, is a museum and education center dedicated to the legacy of Orange County veterans and others who served in the military.

Approximately 40 people attended the event, including command staff from 1st Battalion / 5th Marines at Camp Pendleton, other Marines who served with Donald Hogan, as well as family and friends.

Gunnery Sgt. Juan Elizondo, a military dog ​​handler who patrolled with Donald Hogan and other Marines that night nine years ago, recounted the events leading up to his death.

Hogan had volunteered to patrol to check for reported improvised explosive devices. He and Elizondo had passed a specific spot twice and neither they nor the dog noticed anything suspicious. But when Hogan saw a kite rope in the road suddenly tighten, indicating that an IED was about to be triggered, he pushed a nearby Marine and warned the rest of the team.

Hogan was the only Marine killed that day.

Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy, presented the Navy Cross to the Hogans at Camp Pendleton in 2012. The award is the Corps’ second highest decoration for heroism in combat.

While the Hogans – Gold Star parents – are often recognized at ceremonies at Camp Pendleton, recognition from Heroes Hall also meant a lot to the San Clemente couple.

“It was just beautiful in its simplicity,” Carla Hogan said of the plaque. “That says everything you need to know about Donald and what he did. I’m not sure a lot of people know what a Navy Cross is, but they can read the history of his actions on this day- the.

For the Hogans, Sunday’s tribute was also an opportunity to be with their Marine Corps family and with some of the Marines their son saved that day.

“It was hard to see that the act (of what happened) still had an impact on all the Marines,” Jim Hogan said. “As parents, we think about our loss. The Marines also lost that day. There was a Marine they couldn’t bring home. His company commander, platoon commander and platoon sergeant all wear this today.

“The Marines he saved mourn him and still honor him,” he said. “I think most civilians don’t understand this level of sacrifice because they don’t face it. The Marines live with it every day.

Since Donald Hogan’s death, his parents have remained linked to the Marines.

In 2011, they founded Socks For Heroes, a nonprofit organization that provides socks to deployed Marines. The couple came up with the idea after talking to the Marines and learning what they needed most. During deployments, the Marines reported, they must wash their socks in the canals and air dry them; with the socks constantly picking up sand and gravel, they are unusable within days.

“It has become a mission,” said Carla Hogan. “It was really therapy for Jim and me. It was a way of staying close to the Marine Corps. It was a way of keeping in touch with him.

To date, the Hogans have shipped 48 tonnes (475,000 pairs) of socks with help from groups such as Mission Viejo Elks, Strategic Hotels and San Diego Padres – the team has a sock-wrapping event scheduled for Wednesday. August 29. in Petco Park after the baseball game.

Keeping their son’s memory alive through their charity and outreach activities at Camp Pendleton not only helped their loss, the Hogans said, but showed other Marines the impact of their own service. .

“The greatest honor we have received was at a change of command ceremony when Lt. Col. Mark Carlton told us why we mattered, and that is a reminder to all Marines when they go on duty. war, that they take a family with them, ”says Jim. “It was important for them to know that.”

But the tragedy also left the Hogans with a new family.

“Everyone has two families, one is your blood and the other is from your heart,” he said. “That’s what the Marines are to us.”


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Navy and navy exercise off the coast of San Diego launches the F-35 http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-exercise-off-the-coast-of-san-diego-launches-the-f-35/ http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-exercise-off-the-coast-of-san-diego-launches-the-f-35/#respond Tue, 24 Oct 2017 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-exercise-off-the-coast-of-san-diego-launches-the-f-35/ Photo by Kris Arciaga Above: A marine version of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter flies over the deck of the USS Essex, October 23, 2017. Aired 10/24/17 on KPBS News Dawn Blitz trains Marines for amphibious landings, but it’s also an opportunity for the Navy and Marines to test new skills. The Marines and Navy […]]]>

Photo by Kris Arciaga

Above: A marine version of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter flies over the deck of the USS Essex, October 23, 2017.

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Dawn Blitz trains Marines for amphibious landings, but it’s also an opportunity for the Navy and Marines to test new skills.

The Marines and Navy are conducting massive exercises off the coast of San Diego this week.

Dawn Blitz is a training exercise for Expeditionary Strike Group 3 and 1st Marine Expeditionary Brigade. It is also a field test for the Navy and the Marine Corps. This year, they are testing the Marine version of the new F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.

“It’s an extremely capable aircraft and that’s the shortest way you can put it. The ability to deploy it from here and take off and land vertically. Have multi-mission capabilities. It’s an incredible plane, ”said Rear Admiral Cathal O’Connor.

The F-35 is one of the costliest military programs in US history. The USS Essex is one of the first ships to be modernized to launch the Marines’ new aircraft. The amphibious assault ship is participating in the exercise.

On Monday, the ship launched helicopters and Osprey, as well as the F-35, as part of a simulated landing on San Clemente Island. On Friday, the Marines will stage a mock assault on Red Beach at Camp Pendleton.

In this exercise, the Navy and Marines are also experimenting with shared command. Approximately 1,400 Marines and 2,200 Sailors on four ships participate in Dawn Blitz.

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Navy and Navy helicopters to land at Eisenhower Park on Saturday http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-helicopters-to-land-at-eisenhower-park-on-saturday/ http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-helicopters-to-land-at-eisenhower-park-on-saturday/#respond Mon, 08 May 2017 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/navy-and-navy-helicopters-to-land-at-eisenhower-park-on-saturday/

As part of Fleet Week 2017, Nassau County will once again host a Navy and Navy helicopter landing at Eisenhower Park in East Meadow. The free event will be the only Navy and Navy helicopter landing on Long Island. Participants in this fun, family-friendly activity are allowed to board the plane and also meet military personnel.

The two helicopters will land on Saturday May 27, but at different times. First of all, at 10 am, it is the landing of the Navy. The Leap Frogs, the US Navy’s parachute team, will perform an air parachute demonstration showcasing the skills of the Naval Special Warfare Team. In addition, a combined team of members of the US Navy Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team and a maritime combat helicopter squadron will present a mine countermeasures demonstration.

Then, at 12:30 p.m., the Marines disembark. The CH-53 Sea Stallion, MV-22 Osprey and AH-1W Cobras will perform an area sweep and transport a sea raid force to the landing zone. The Marines will perform an assault demonstration, after which the helicopters will land and be available for public display, along with weapons typically used by a Marine Corps rifle platoon.

Helicopter landings will take place at the kite field, just south of the Veterans Memorial at Eisenhower Park, with parking at lot 6A and adjacent parking lots. New security rules have redefined spectator areas, so everyone is advised to arrive early.

Northwell Health will also be present at the event with exhibits, vehicles, entertainment and support for participating military personnel.


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