War submarine – US Submarine http://us-submarine.com/ Tue, 28 Sep 2021 02:01:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://us-submarine.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-28T233436.077-150x150.png War submarine – US Submarine http://us-submarine.com/ 32 32 China, UK clash over ‘Cold War’ submarine pact with Australia to counter Beijing http://us-submarine.com/china-uk-clash-over-cold-war-submarine-pact-with-australia-to-counter-beijing/ http://us-submarine.com/china-uk-clash-over-cold-war-submarine-pact-with-australia-to-counter-beijing/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 10:35:16 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/china-uk-clash-over-cold-war-submarine-pact-with-australia-to-counter-beijing/ China and the UK clashed over a new security pact to counter Beijing with nuclear-powered submarines, after the West was accused of a “cold war mentality.” The Chinese government has reacted angrily to the announcement of the AUKUS alliance between Australia, the United States and Britain, also involving cyberwar and artificial intelligence projects. “They should […]]]>

China and the UK clashed over a new security pact to counter Beijing with nuclear-powered submarines, after the West was accused of a “cold war mentality.”

The Chinese government has reacted angrily to the announcement of the AUKUS alliance between Australia, the United States and Britain, also involving cyberwar and artificial intelligence projects.

“They should get rid of their Cold War mentality and ideological prejudices,” said Liu Pengyu, spokesperson for the Chinese embassy in Washington.

Ben Wallace, Secretary of Defense, insisted Australia’s decision to obtain nuclear-powered submarines, backed by London and Washington, was not intended to “upset anyone”.

But he directly underlined Beijing’s provocation, telling the BBC: “China is embarking on one of the biggest military spending and military investments in history, it is developing its navy and air force to a minimum. huge, extremely fast pace. Obviously, he is engaged in controversial areas and in contested areas. ”

“So we have seen this, this is China, this is what they are doing at the moment and it is right that the UK, alongside other allies such as Australia, is standing up for the founded system. on rules and international law. “

On the allegation of a Cold War mentality, Mr Wallace added: “I think they are wrong. I mean, China has invested in our civilian nuclear system here and no one has called it an act of the Cold War.

“During the Cold War, everyone was stuck behind fences and didn’t really communicate with each other and certainly didn’t engage in global trade, and I think it’s probably a Cold War vision to describe it. like a cold war. “

Mr Wallace also acknowledged French frustration with Australia, which broke a $ 90 billion deal with Paris to buy new diesel-electric submarines, in favor of nuclear-powered ones.

“I understand the disappointment of France. They had a contract with the Australians for diesel-electric from 2016 and the Australians have made this decision that they want to make a change.

“We didn’t go fishing for that, but as a close ally, when the Australians approached us, of course we considered it. I understand France’s frustration on this subject.


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The untold story of an Italian WWII submarine sunk off the coast of the United Arab Emirates http://us-submarine.com/the-untold-story-of-an-italian-wwii-submarine-sunk-off-the-coast-of-the-united-arab-emirates/ http://us-submarine.com/the-untold-story-of-an-italian-wwii-submarine-sunk-off-the-coast-of-the-united-arab-emirates/#respond Wed, 30 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/the-untold-story-of-an-italian-wwii-submarine-sunk-off-the-coast-of-the-united-arab-emirates/ June 23, 1940. An enemy submarine arrives off the coast of the modern United Arab Emirates to wreak havoc in the Gulf of Oman. The Luigi Galvani aims to disrupt tanker traffic around the Strait of Hormuz to fuel the British war effort. Conditions in the Italian submarine were harsh and the sweltering summer heat […]]]>

June 23, 1940. An enemy submarine arrives off the coast of the modern United Arab Emirates to wreak havoc in the Gulf of Oman.

The Luigi Galvani aims to disrupt tanker traffic around the Strait of Hormuz to fuel the British war effort.

Conditions in the Italian submarine were harsh and the sweltering summer heat was harsh.

The waters of the Gulf were eerily calm that day with no tankers in sight. It was a disturbing sign.

“We always read about submarine warfare in the Atlantic,” said Ali Iqbal, a United Arab Emirates-based historian who has researched Luigi Galvanithe story of. “But this kind of story also exists off the United Arab Emirates.”

I had the strong impression that the boat was lost. I decided to emerge

Lieutenant Commander Renato Spano

In June 1940, a sinister new front opened up during World War II. France fell to the Germans and Italy joined the Nazi camp. On June 10, Italy sent several submarines from Eritrea – then one of its colonies – to the Arabian Sea. Luigi Galvani was one of them. The 72.5-meter Brin class was named after the famous Italian scientist and built in 1938 by the Franco Tosi company in its Taranto shipyards.

But British forces in the Gulf had learned of his plan, warned tankers of the danger and sent HMS Falmouth to track him down. On the evening of June 23, the vessel spotted a “blackened object” in the water. It was the Galvani. HMS Falmouth approached within 548 meters and opened fire. The submarine commander ordered a dive but the sloop fired three depth charges.

“I had a strong feeling that the boat was lost,” wrote submarine Lieutenant-Commander Renato Spano. “I decided to emerge. The submarine responded with great difficulty, emerging [on the surface] only in part.

But the damage was so severe that it sank in the early hours of June 24. According to a UK assessment of the clash, it was estimated that poor surveillance allowed the HMS Falmouth approach so close without being detected. Twenty-six of the 57 crew members died.

“The prisoners were taken to India and then back to Italy after the war. They were treated well, ”Mr. Iqbal said.

Eighty-one years after the sinking, the forgotten history of the Italian submarine challenges assumptions that nothing happened here during this war. But the threat was real and people died.

In 1943, Allied planes stopped to refuel in Sharjah as part of a huge resupply effort in the east. The war brought food shortages to the region, but despite this, the Bedouin still helped survivors of Allied air crashes. Thousands of people crowded the streets and danced until sunset when news of the Allied victory in 1945 was heard in Dubai and Sharjah, while a memorial to a British aviator who died in Fujairah attracts annual memorial services.

From Galvani dead was Pietro Venuti, who was posthumously awarded a Gold Medal of Military Bravery for locking himself in the torpedo room to prevent water from entering other compartments. His actions saved lives and the Italian Navy in 2014 launched a submarine after him in tribute.

The affected submarine sank 80 meters to the bottom of the sea about 40 nautical miles northeast of Dibba. He has rested there for more than eight decades, intact in a silent world.

“The Galvani was perhaps the first time that the Axis [German, Italy and Japanese] Allied forces threatened Allied forces in the region and it was the first submarine we know of to sink, ”said Mr. Iqbal, who co-wrote an article with the UAE culture historian, Peter Hellyer, on Axis submarine activity for the Emirates National History Group newspaper, Tribulus. “The British realized that these submarines endangered shipping. “

The increase in Axis submarine activity forced the British Royal Air Force in 1942 to base a squadron of Blenheim bombers in Sharjah to deal with the threat. Planes operating from the base sank the German submarine 533 off the coast of Fujairah in 1943. Japanese submarines were also active in the Arabian Sea and inflicted damage on Allied ships before s ‘escape.

The wreck of the Galvani, meanwhile, is at the bottom of the sea near Iranian territorial waters. Several reports over the years have detailed how UAE-based dive teams were trying to reach it, but these have never been confirmed.

“I have lived in the UAE for the past 30 years and being able to research and publish these little-known events and add a little part of the wonderful UAE history is a great honor,” Mr. Iqbal said.

“Not only because this lesser-known story is being told, but also because individuals – Emiratis and others – are remembered.”

Update: July 1, 2021, 6:40 a.m.


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Portsmouth World War I submarine wreck HMS / m D1 receives protected status http://us-submarine.com/portsmouth-world-war-i-submarine-wreck-hms-m-d1-receives-protected-status/ http://us-submarine.com/portsmouth-world-war-i-submarine-wreck-hms-m-d1-receives-protected-status/#respond Fri, 14 May 2021 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/portsmouth-world-war-i-submarine-wreck-hms-m-d1-receives-protected-status/ Known as HMS / m D1, it was the forerunner of the Royal Navy’s patrol submarines and served in WWI. It was built by Vickers at Barrow-in-Furness and was the secret prototype of the D-class, the Royal Navy’s first diesel-powered submarines. Read more Read more LCT 7074: D-Day landing craft tank at Southsea to reopen […]]]>

Known as HMS / m D1, it was the forerunner of the Royal Navy’s patrol submarines and served in WWI.

It was built by Vickers at Barrow-in-Furness and was the secret prototype of the D-class, the Royal Navy’s first diesel-powered submarines.

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Undated photo released by Wessex Archeology of the submarine HMS / mD1 which was deliberately sunk off Dartmouth Photo: PA Wire

Launched in 1908 and commissioned in September 1909, the D-class was a significant development over the C-class submarine, being larger and more powerful.

At the start of the war in 1914, the submarine was assigned to protect the coast of Dover against enemy invasion.

In September 1917, HMS / m D1 joined the Portsmouth Local Defense Flotilla and a year later was relegated to training duties.

Weeks before the end of the war, she was decommissioned and scuttled off the coast of Dartmouth.

A multi-beam emitted by Wessex Archeology from the submarine HMS / mD1 Photo: Wessex Archeology / PA Wire

The submarine was then used as a target for Royal Navy training exercises involving the detection of enemy submarines.

The wreckage, which lies upright and largely intact on the seabed, has been identified by divers skilled at working at depths of over 40 meters.

It had been identified by submarine historian Michael Lowrey who was writing a book about submarine losses in WWI.

The submarine has now obtained protection from the Department of Digital Culture, Media and Sports on the advice of Historic England.

This means that divers can dive into the wreckage, but its contents are protected by law and must remain in place.

Duncan Wilson, Managing Director of Historic England, said: “The Class D submarine was superior to the Class C, with innovations that became part of future Royal Navy submarines.

“These included diesel propulsion, twin propellers and a wireless telegraphy system that allowed the submarine to transmit and receive signals.

“It’s a fascinating survival that deserves to be protected as an important part of our maritime history. “

Chief diver Steve Mortimer said: “Every diver dreams of identifying a wreck of historic significance.

“Hoping to find the remains of a German submarine, we were delighted to find a revolutionary British submarine instead.

“It’s great that D1 is now protected, but divers can still visit it. “

Eight Class D submarines were built.

HMS / m D2, HMS / m D3 and HMS / m D6 were sunk outside English territorial waters, while HMS / m D4, HMS / m D7 and HMS / m D8 were sold and scrapped in 1919.

The wreck of HMS / m D5 is located off Lowestoft in Suffolk, and is protected by the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986.


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The Day – Waterford Library presents virtual lecture on Civil War submarine mystery on Tuesday http://us-submarine.com/the-day-waterford-library-presents-virtual-lecture-on-civil-war-submarine-mystery-on-tuesday/ http://us-submarine.com/the-day-waterford-library-presents-virtual-lecture-on-civil-war-submarine-mystery-on-tuesday/#respond Fri, 12 Mar 2021 08:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/the-day-waterford-library-presents-virtual-lecture-on-civil-war-submarine-mystery-on-tuesday/ A reporter expresses concern to author Rachel Lance about the amount of information to be given in a newspaper article on her book “In the Waves – My Quest to Solve the Mystery of a Civil War Submarine”. Lance laughs and says, “Spoiler! Everyone dies!” It’s true. The entire eight-person crew of the HL Hunley, […]]]>

A reporter expresses concern to author Rachel Lance about the amount of information to be given in a newspaper article on her book “In the Waves – My Quest to Solve the Mystery of a Civil War Submarine”.

Lance laughs and says, “Spoiler! Everyone dies!”

It’s true. The entire eight-person crew of the HL Hunley, the Confederate Civil War submarine credited with the sinking of the USS Housatonic in Charleston Harbor in 1864 – the first incident of a successful submarine attack in the history – will die. Readers discover it from the very first pages.

The big question at the heart of the book – a wonderfully constructed work that combines elements of narrative non-fiction, memory, and historical mystery – is not whether the victims died, but how. Late one night in February, the HL Hunley approached the Housatonic, which was part of a blockade to the north to withhold supplies from the Confederate city. By extending a spar torpedo and placing it against the hull of the large ship, the crew of the HL Hunley detonated the weapon. Five Housatonic crew members perished and the ship was destroyed.

However, the Hunley also went missing during the mission and remained missing until discovered in harbor waters in 2000 – with the skeletal remains of the crew in their positions and no visible signs of trauma. , or that one of them reacted to enemy fire. or any kind of malfunction suggesting that the vessel has suddenly taken on water and caused panic.

Lance will address these questions and more on Tuesday in a virtual presentation sponsored by the Waterford Public Library.

The idea for the book, which is his first, was a bit of a happy accident. Lance, a biomedical engineer and blast injury specialist who studies the effects of underwater explosions on the human body, holds a PhD from Duke University and a full curriculum vitae that includes working for the US Navy as a civil engineer who designed rebreather systems for navy divers. . Currently, in addition to her nascent career as an author, Lance is employed as a research scientist at the Duke University Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology.

She stumbled across the Hunley case while researching a dissertation topic for her PhD, and the elements of the mystery, all of which are of her natural interest and curiosity, immediately captivated her. The more she learned, the more Lance suspected there was a book to write – a Howdunit, if you will – because there were so many unanswered questions about what happened to the Hunley’s crew and why the submarine sank.

One important thing to note: Lance intuitively, and with a natural wit and tone, conveys dense scientific detail on issues such as fluid dynamics and the different reactions of explosions depending on whether they occur in air or under water in a way that is easy to understand – and indeed fascinates – the layman.

But that’s only part of the appeal. Lance provides details of her own life and her involvement in the story with often hilarious observations and the development of real-life friendships with unlikely people as she weaves her way through her investigation. Released in 2020, “In the Waves” is one of the best mysteries you’ll read, a delightful autobiography and intro to complex science and physics that will make you wonder why you hated math to begin with.

On Wednesday, Lance took a few minutes to talk about her career and how it led to the writing of “In the Waves”. In conversation, she tends to laugh out loud, is very modest, and speaks with the enthusiasm of someone who clearly enjoys what they are doing. Here are some of the questions she answered, edited for space and clarity.

Question: It is the land of submarines here with the American naval base and the electric boat. Have you ever visited and what did you think of?

A: I visited. Sure! I was very impressed, but it is also true that I am obsessed with submarines. All submarines! The submarine base has excellent facilities and, thanks to what I do, I have had the chance to visit the on-site acoustic testing laboratories and hyperbaric chambers. Unbelievable.

Question: Do you think the HL Hunley, with its small dimensions and lack of modern technology, could for these reasons sneak into the waters of the Thames and attack the submarine base?

A: (Laughs) I have no idea what the submarine base’s defense system is, but I suspect it’s probably up to the challenge. Interestingly, the Hunley’s design has persisted over the years. During WWII, Germany had advanced submarine technology and used slightly smaller vehicles reminiscent of the Hunley design.

Question: As a layman unable to grasp even the fundamentals of basic science and mathematics, I was able to formulate a theory fairly quickly by reading “In the Waves”. Was I wrong? Yes, squeaking as well. But it makes me wonder: did you get from the start what turned out to be an accurate working theory of what happened in Charleston Harbor that night? And anyway, how did you go about proving it?

A: I suspected what had happened because of my history of explosion trauma. But suspicion means nothing in science without data. You have to rule out all the other theories; you have to try to prove yourself wrong. If you don’t, you might be right.

Question: One of the great things about this book is the readability of your descriptions of the scientific process, including establishing unlikely relationships with all kinds of people as a result of experiments. These anecdotes are amazing and funny.

A: Well, I’m thinking about what’s going on in science. The experiences got more and more difficult as we went along, and it can get stressful. (Laughs) I think I lost 12 pounds while writing the book. But, yes, I made some friends. In a way, we all got together. Who would have thought that I would meet and get to know an older North Carolina tobacco farmer? Or a reenactor of the Civil War? And we certainly keep in touch.

Question: How did it occur to you to write a book about your experiences, and how did you sell it?

A: I lost my job in the Navy when I was doing a hyperbaric chamber project. And the project was important to me because we are trying to save the lives of Navy divers. I needed the money to keep going, and figured if I could find an agent and sell a book that might help fund the work.

I got advice from a colleague at Duke, a writer, and the advice was to go to a bookstore and find books that looked a bit like what I wanted to do. Go to the acknowledgments section in the books and write down the name of the authors’ agents as they always thank them. So I was standing in a bookstore leafing through books and writing names. And I got a result in the first batch of five queries I sent. I have been very lucky.

Question: Were you able to complete the hyperbaric chamber project?

A: I was! And I’m happy to say it’s successful.

Question: Do you have a contact in the region? How did the Waterford Library event come about?

A: They were kind enough to email me and ask! I was brought up in public libraries and read constantly. I wouldn’t have had access to so much material without the libraries, and my parents didn’t always have the means to buy all the books I wanted. And to this day, there is something wonderful and delicious about the semi-randomness of a public library. We’re all used to the idea that, you know, if you want to know something specific, just go online and google it. But I like going to a library with the idea of ​​learning something without a plan. Just walk around and see what’s interesting, then dive right in. So I was very happy to hear from Waterford and to have this opportunity.

Question: It almost seems unfair that one can be a biomedical engineer with a focus on pulmonary physiology, an explosion injury specialist, and a fluent writer effortlessly. And I don’t want to focus on the morbid. But for the last question: if you could pick one incident in history that you would be called to the scene as a blast injury specialist, what would it be?

A: (Laughs) Well, from an academic research point of view, I would say in the trenches of World War I. It was the first war with a high rate of explosives casualties, and it was something that many people did not know at the time. It would be fascinating to experience it and learn from it at the source.


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Documents from the sinking of a Cold War submarine in Maine have been declassified http://us-submarine.com/documents-from-the-sinking-of-a-cold-war-submarine-in-maine-have-been-declassified/ http://us-submarine.com/documents-from-the-sinking-of-a-cold-war-submarine-in-maine-have-been-declassified/#respond Thu, 24 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/documents-from-the-sinking-of-a-cold-war-submarine-in-maine-have-been-declassified/ The Navy will release more information in the coming months, but don’t believe the documents will shed new light on the cause of the sinking. The Navy has started releasing declassified documents from the investigation into the deadliest submarine disaster in U.S. history. A judge has ordered the declassification of approximately 4,000 documents relating to […]]]>

The Navy will release more information in the coming months, but don’t believe the documents will shed new light on the cause of the sinking.

The Navy has started releasing declassified documents from the investigation into the deadliest submarine disaster in U.S. history.

A judge has ordered the declassification of approximately 4,000 documents relating to the sinking of the USS Thresher 57 years ago. The first batch of pages was released to the public on Wednesday.

USS Thresher was a submarine built at the Portsmouth Shipyard in Kittery, Maine. She tragically sank off the coast of New England on April 10, 1963, taking all 129 men on board with her. The documents were released pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act ruling issued earlier this year.

The Navy will release more information in the coming months, but don’t believe the documents will shed new light on the cause of the sinking.

The nuclear-powered submarine and the 129 men on board were lost during a test dive in the Atlantic Ocean in 1963. The submarine came to rest on the ocean floor, at around 220 miles off Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire, a senior member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, issued a statement on the newly declassified documents.

The family members of the brave men lost aboard the USS Thresher have lived with unanswered questions about the loss of loved ones for more than 50 years. I hope these documents will help to close“Shaheen said.”The pain of Thresher’s tragedy is still felt today by the children and loved ones who were left behind. While nothing can make up for their loss, I hope this new information sheds light and helps families heal as we continue to honor and remember the brave 129 of the USS Thresher. “

Shaheen successfully led bipartisan efforts in Congress to establish a memorial to the lost men aboard the USS Thresher at Arlington National Cemetery. Last year, Shaheen gave the opening speech at the memorial’s unveiling.


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Canada’s secret underwater drone of the Cold War is still alive today http://us-submarine.com/canadas-secret-underwater-drone-of-the-cold-war-is-still-alive-today/ http://us-submarine.com/canadas-secret-underwater-drone-of-the-cold-war-is-still-alive-today/#respond Sun, 12 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/canadas-secret-underwater-drone-of-the-cold-war-is-still-alive-today/ Extra-large autonomous submarines could revolutionize intelligence gathering and underwater espionage. One of these innovative projects is that of the United States Navy Boeing Orc Extra Large Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (XLUUV). It is much bigger than any other underwater drone currently in the water. But there is a historical precursor who, despite its epic Cold War […]]]>

Extra-large autonomous submarines could revolutionize intelligence gathering and underwater espionage. One of these innovative projects is that of the United States Navy Boeing Orc Extra Large Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (XLUUV). It is much bigger than any other underwater drone currently in the water. But there is a historical precursor who, despite its epic Cold War history, is not widely known. And its mission, to establish covert sensor networks in the Arctic, may be as relevant today as it was then.

During the Cold War, NATO believed that Russian submarines used the Canadian Arctic ice cap as cover to secretly move between the Atlantic and the Pacific. The United States and Canada have therefore installed a special sonar network there, deep under the ice. Canadian engineers had to build the world’s largest autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Theseus, to lay a cable where ships couldn’t reach.

The project began in the 1980s, at a time when Russian submarines were getting much quieter. To listen to them, a joint US and Canadian sonar array had to be positioned several hundred miles north of the remote Canadian base at CFS Alert. The table was codenamed Spinnaker, in honor of the bar where scientists made many of the project’s unclassified decisions. It was similar to the now famous SOSUS (Sound Surveillance System), but used classified technology to match its operational circumstances. In fact, it had to be much more advanced than the original SOSUS.

Connecting the sonar network to the base would require laying a fiber-optic cable hundreds of kilometers below the permanent ice cap. The solution was to build the world’s largest autonomous underwater vehicle. The unmanned submarine would swim from a hole in the ice closer to the base to the Spinnaker array. Gradually, the cable unwound from the rear. Thus “Theseus” takes its name from the mythical hero of ancient Greece who dragged a thread behind him when he ventured into the labyrinth to fight the Minotaur.

When you think of advanced Canadian military projects that were ahead of their time, Avro Canada CF-105 Arrow comes to mind. This Mach-2 delta wing fighter flew in the 1950s and was state of the art at the time, one of the best planes ever. But it was abruptly canceled in 1959 before it could enter service. The AUV Theseus is up there with the Avro Arrow, but less well recognized. And unlike the Arrow, it was used in an operational way, in one of the most daring projects launched during the Cold War.

The project had many secret aspects. Years later, much of what we know about the project comes from Bruce Butler, one of the core team members involved. Bulter wrote a book, In the labyrinth (on Amazon), and I recently spoke to Underwater Technology Podcast about the project.

Theseus was 35 feet long and about 4 feet wide. In terms of AUV, this is important even today. In modern naval terminology, it would be classified as a Large Displacement Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (LDUUV).

The Spinnaker sonar system was placed on the seabed just on the edge of the Arctic platform. It was about 84 degrees north in the upper right corner of Canada, near Greenland. Such an advanced project took years to come to fruition, so it wasn’t until the spring of 1996 that Thésée was able to get to work on laying the cable. The whole operation was pushing the limits of unmanned underwater vehicles at the time. Despite a few close calls along the way, Theseus was able to navigate to the Spinnaker, letting the vital thread slip out as he went.

Many details of the project and the technology involved are still classified. And we may never know if Spinnaker has ever picked up Russian submarines. By the time it was laid, the Russian Navy was in sharp decline after the end of the Cold War.

But with the resurgence of the Russian Navy today, the relevance of systems like Spinnaker may be greater than ever. And one of the roles that large underwater drones like the Orca could play is to lay cables on the seabed, invisible from above. Historical precedents like Theseus can help us understand how they might be used and the challenges they will face.


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Discovery of a lost Cold War submarine http://us-submarine.com/discovery-of-a-lost-cold-war-submarine/ http://us-submarine.com/discovery-of-a-lost-cold-war-submarine/#respond Tue, 10 Mar 2020 07:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/discovery-of-a-lost-cold-war-submarine/ Veteran Ocean Explorer and Tiburon submarine CEO Tim Taylor and his “Lost 52 Project” team added submarine ocean discoveries to their list USS Stickleback (SS 415). The submarine was lost 62 years ago in nearly 11,000 feet of water and is one of four submarines that suffered this fate during the Cold War. In nine […]]]>

Veteran Ocean Explorer and Tiburon submarine CEO Tim Taylor and his “Lost 52 Project” team added submarine ocean discoveries to their list USS Stickleback (SS 415). The submarine was lost 62 years ago in nearly 11,000 feet of water and is one of four submarines that suffered this fate during the Cold War.

In nine years, Taylor and his Lost 52 project team discovered six US submarines using pioneering robotics and methods at the cutting edge of today’s submarine technology. By applying a combination of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) and advanced photogrammetric imaging technology, Taylor and his team have amassed the most comprehensive historical archaeological record to date, said the team.

The WWII submarine Stickleback was commissioned on March 29, 1945. The submarine was deployed to Guam and began its first war patrol on August 6 of the same year when it left for the Sea of ​​Japan. Stickleback arrived the following week and began his patrol. During this period, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and it was believed that the war would end shortly.

Stickleback had only been in the patrol area for two days when the ceasefire order was adopted. He remained in the area and on August 21 saw two bamboo rafts containing 19 survivors from a freighter. They were embarked for 18 hours, fed, fed, cared for and floated a short distance from one of the Japanese islands.

Stickleback returned to Guam on September 9, 1945. He left for the United States the next day, arrived in San Francisco, and participated in the Third Fleet parade on September 28. After a short cruise to the Hawaiian Islands, Stickleback was disarmed and put into reserve on June 26, 1946.

Sonar image of the forward hull of the USS Strickleback. Image of the lost project team 52

The submarine was returned to service on September 6, 1951 and served in San Diego as a training ship. She was decommissioned a second time on November 14, 1952 and converted to a Guppy IIA type submarine. Returned to service on June 26, 1953, Stickleback joined Sub Squadron 7 at Pearl Harbor. The Sub supported United Nations forces in Korea from February to July 1954 when it returned to Pearl Harbor. From 1954 to 1957, it conducted intelligence gathering operations off the coast of the Soviet Union.

May 28, 1958, Stickleback was participating in an anti-submarine warfare exercise with the escort destroyer USS Silverstein (DE 534) and a torpedo catcher in the Hawaii area.

During these exercises, the submarine had just completed a simulated torpedo on Silverstein and was diving to a safe depth when he lost power and descended uncontrollably to nearly 800 feet. Emergency buoyancy ballast was added and the vessel quickly mounted only to pass about 200 yards (180 m) ahead of the destroyer escort. Upon consent, a rocket could not be fired because the crew had evacuated the aft torpedo room. The collision alarm was triggered and Silverstein backed up fully, rudder fully to the left, but could not avoid a collision. The result was a hole in the submarine on its port side and the loss of the submarine.

Remarkably, there were no deaths. The SticklebackThe torpedo crew were removed by the torpedo, and combined efforts were made by several ships to save the submarine. Rescue ships tied lines around her, but all compartments were flooded, and Stickleback sank in 1,800 fathoms (3,300 m) of water.

Stickleback is the third submarine to be discovered of the four Navy submarines lost since the end of World War II. USS Cochino (SS 345), USS Thresher (SSN 593), and USS Scorpion (SSN 589) were also lost during the Cold War.

“Project Lost 52 continues to expand our work to search for other lost ships of World War II. After making the historic discovery of the USS Grayback and the final resting place for its 80 valiant crews off the coast of Japan, I am proud of this recent Cold War discovery that honors men, their memory and their mission, ”Taylor said in a prepared statement.

“We are grateful for the respectful and non-intrusive work of Project Lost 52 in locating and documenting Navy submarine wrecks,” said Dr Bob Neyland, head of the Underwater Archeology branch of Naval History. and Heritage Command. “Each discovery assists the Naval History and Heritage Command in its mission to preserve and protect sunken Navy military ships and provides an opportunity to remember and honor the service of our sailors and navies. “

The discovery of the Stickleback is part of the ongoing “Lost 52 Project” supported in part by STEP Ventures and has been recognized by JAMSTEC (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology) as the first and most comprehensive offshore submarine archaeological expedition in Japanese waters .


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USS Grayback: 75-year-old World War II submarine discovered near Japan | The independent http://us-submarine.com/uss-grayback-75-year-old-world-war-ii-submarine-discovered-near-japan-the-independent/ http://us-submarine.com/uss-grayback-75-year-old-world-war-ii-submarine-discovered-near-japan-the-independent/#respond Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/uss-grayback-75-year-old-world-war-ii-submarine-discovered-near-japan-the-independent/ A 75-year-old mystery has been solved and the families of 80 American sailors lost at sea will now be closed. The USS Grayback has finally been found. He has been hidden from discovery all this time by a single wandering figure. The mystery began on January 28, 1944, when the Grayback, one of the most […]]]>

A 75-year-old mystery has been solved and the families of 80 American sailors lost at sea will now be closed.

The USS Grayback has finally been found. He has been hidden from discovery all this time by a single wandering figure.

The mystery began on January 28, 1944, when the Grayback, one of the most successful American submarines of World War II, left Pearl Harbor on its 10th Combat Patrol.

At the end of March, the return of the submarine was over three weeks overdue and the US Navy classified the submarine as missing and presumed lost.

After the war, the navy attempted to piece together a full history of the 52 submarines it had lost. The story, published in 1949, gave the approximate locations of where each submarine had gone.

The Grayback was thought to have sunk in the open sea 100 miles east-southeast of Okinawa. But the navy had subconsciously relied on an erroneous translation of the Japanese war records that was wrong with a figure on the latitude and longitude of where the Grayback had likely reached its end.

The error was not detected until last year, when an amateur researcher, Yutaka Iwasaki, was browsing the war archives at the Imperial Japanese Navy base in Sasebo.

The files included daily reports received by radio from Naval Air Station Naha, Okinawa – and the February 27, 1944 entry contained a promising lead.

Today’s report indicated that a Nakajima B5N ship-borne bomber dropped a 500-pound bomb on a submarine on the surface, hitting just aft of the turret. The submarine exploded and sank immediately, and there were no survivors.

“In this radio recording, there is a longitude and latitude of the attack, very clearly,” Mr. Iwasaki said. And that didn’t match what was in naval history of 1949, not a hundred miles.

Mr. Iwasaki is a systems engineer who lives in Kobe, Japan, who became fascinated as a teenager with Japanese WWII merchant ships – four-fifths of which were sunk during the war, a-t- he declares.

The discovery of the history of these ships necessarily brought him into contact with records on submarines. “For me, finding American submarines is part of my business to present the tragic history of war,” he said. “It’s my hobby and also my passion. “

His work brought him to the attention of Tim Taylor, an underwater explorer who set out to find the wrecks of all American submarines lost in the war.

In 2010, he found his first submarine, the USS R-12, off Key West, Florida, where he sank during a training exercise in 1943. He set up the project. Lost 52 privately funded to track down the rest, building on technology that had available over the past 10 to 15 years.

Mr. Taylor says that of the 52 lost US submarines, 47 are considered discoverable; the other five were washed up or destroyed in known locations.

Mr Taylor and his wife, Christine Dennison, searched for these 47 people and began to focus on those who were likely sunk near Japan.

Through his work in underwater exploration, Mr. Taylor was introduced to Don Walsh, a former Navy submariner who, as a lieutenant in 1960, reached the deepest point in all oceans. Earth, in the Mariana Trench near Guam.

Mr. Walsh gave Mr. Taylor his copy of 1949 Navy History, American submarine losses, WWII.

Armed with the information in this book and Mr. Iwasaki’s discovery, Mr. Taylor and the team at Lost 52 set out to attempt to find the Grayback.

The Grayback’s last patrol was its third under the command of Lt Cmdr John Moore, who had received the Navy Cross for each of the first two.

His third Navy Cross will be awarded posthumously, after the submarine sent 21,594 tons of Japanese ships from below on its last mission. In all, the Grayback sank more than a dozen Japanese ships. The Navy considers submarines like the Grayback to be “always on patrol”.

As Lt Cmdr Moore had done 75 years earlier, Mr. Taylor launched his mission to Okinawa this spring from Hawaii. When they reached Japanese waters in June, he and his team faced mechanical and electrical issues that hampered their mission.

They were looking for an area where the ocean was 1,400 feet deep, and their primary search tool was a 14-foot-long autonomous underwater vehicle weighing thousands of pounds that Mr. Taylor compared to an underwater drone. marine.

It would dive a few hundred feet above the seabed, then spend 24 hours pinging different sonar back and forth for about 10 square nautical miles.

When the drone returned to the mothership, technicians uploaded its data, using computer software to assemble all of the sonar images into a single cohesive image that they could quickly review.

“When you’re at these sites, it feels like you’re one step away from getting home,” Taylor said of the search box. “So every day is precious. “

On the penultimate day of the expedition, the drone reported a malfunction a third of the way for a scheduled 24-hour mission.

An undated photo provided by the Lost52 Project shows Tim Taylor, an underwater explorer. Taylor set up Project Lost 52 to track down lost US submarines, building on technology that has only become available in the past 10 to 15 years. (Project Tim Taylor / Lost52 via The New York Times) –

(Project 52 lost)

As they retrieved the drone, Mr Taylor said, half of his crew began preparing the ship to return to port, believing the vehicle was likely to be beyond repair. But Mr. Taylor began to examine the images captured by the drone.

He quickly spotted two anomalies on the seabed and prepared another remotely operated vehicle from the ship to visit the bottom. Unlike the drone, it was piloted manually from the mother ship and had high definition cameras.

Within hours, Mr. Taylor was looking at the hull of the Grayback. About 400 feet away was the submarine’s deck cannon, which had exploded when the bomb exploded.

“We were delighted,” said Mr. Taylor. “But that’s also sobering, because we just found 80 men.” The next day, Mr. Taylor and his crew held a ceremony in memory of the sailors lost aboard the ship and called out their names one by one.

One of those names was John Patrick King.

His nephew John Bihn, of Wantagh, New York, is named after him. Mr Bihn, who was born three years after the sinking of the Grayback, remembers him as a constant presence in his maternal grandparents’ house, where a black and white photo of the submarine hung in the sitting near a black frame holding Mr. King’s Purple Heart Medal and quote.

(Project 52 lost

(Project 52 lost)

But in his family, the subject of his uncle’s death was “too sad to be questioned,” Mr Bihn said. “My mother would cry very often if you told her about it.” “

With no bodies to bury, Mr Bihn’s grandparents, Patrick and Catherine King, commemorated their son on their own tombstone. Under their names, Mr Binh said, they had engraved “John Patrick King ‘Lost in Action'”.

Mr Bihn received a text message from his sister Katherine Taylor (unrelated to Tim Taylor) two weeks ago saying the Grayback had been found. She had heard from Mrs. Dennison.

“I was stunned,” he said. “I couldn’t believe it. I wish my parents were alive to see this, because it would certainly make them very happy.

In a video taken by the vehicle that inspected the wreckage, Mr Binh said, the camera tilted upward at one point to show the command turret, and a plaque stating “USS Grayback” was evident. .

“It’s like someone cleaned it up,” Bihn said. “It’s like he wants to be found.”

New York Times


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World War II submarine missing for 75 years has been found http://us-submarine.com/world-war-ii-submarine-missing-for-75-years-has-been-found/ http://us-submarine.com/world-war-ii-submarine-missing-for-75-years-has-been-found/#respond Mon, 11 Nov 2019 08:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/world-war-ii-submarine-missing-for-75-years-has-been-found/ It has been 75 years since the USS Grayback disappeared with 80 sailors on board. Now, an organization that searches for sunken WWII submarines has solved the mystery of where it crashed. Underwater explorer Tim Taylor and his Project Lost 52 team announced on Sunday that they had located the long-lost submarine on June 5 […]]]>

It has been 75 years since the USS Grayback disappeared with 80 sailors on board. Now, an organization that searches for sunken WWII submarines has solved the mystery of where it crashed.

Underwater explorer Tim Taylor and his Project Lost 52 team announced on Sunday that they had located the long-lost submarine on June 5 about 1,427 feet underwater off Okinawa, in Japan.

Last year, researcher Yutaka Iwasaki discovered that the Navy originally made a mistake in translating Japanese war records which specified where the Grayback likely sank. All the while, the Navy’s historical records had listed an incorrect longitude for the location of the submarine.

Armed with this information, along with recently discovered and translated Japanese mission logs, Taylor told CNN his team had embarked on an expedition to find the Grayback, this time to the area southwest of Okinawa. .

With the help of autonomous underwater vehicles, remote control vehicles, and advanced imaging technology, the team discovered the Grayback about 100 miles from the area where it was originally thought to be was shot.

The find has been officially confirmed by the Navy, Robert S. Neyland, chief of the underwater archeology branch of the Naval History and Heritage Command, said in a press release.

The Grayback disappeared in 1944

On January 28, 1944, the Grayback set sail from Pearl Harbor for the East China Sea for its 10th combat patrol.

About a month later, the submarine reported the sinking of two Japanese cargo ships on February 19. But the attack left the Grayback with only two torpedoes, and it was ordered to return from patrol.

Although the Grayback was due to arrive in Midway on March 7, more than three weeks have passed without seeing the submarine. And on March 30, 1944, the Grayback, one of the most successful submarines of WWII, was declared lost.

Families will finally close

Gloria Hurney, whose uncle Raymond Parks died on the Grayback, said she was not sure the Grayback would ever be recovered.

So when she first learned of the discovery, she felt a mixture of shock, disbelief, sadness and grief. Eventually, however, those feelings turned into relief, comfort, and peace.

“The discovery puts an end to questions surrounding the Grayback regarding its sinking and location,” Hurney said in a statement to CNN. “I believe it will provide healing as the loved ones of the crew members come together to share their stories.”

The Navy echoed this sentiment.

“Each discovery of a sunken craft is an opportunity to remember and honor the service of our sailors,” Neyland said in a statement. “Knowing their final resting place brings closure, in part, to their families and shipmates and allows our team to better understand the circumstances in which the boat was lost.”


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Lost WWII submarine built in Barrow discovered after 77 years http://us-submarine.com/lost-wwii-submarine-built-in-barrow-discovered-after-77-years/ http://us-submarine.com/lost-wwii-submarine-built-in-barrow-discovered-after-77-years/#respond Tue, 05 Nov 2019 08:00:00 +0000 http://us-submarine.com/lost-wwii-submarine-built-in-barrow-discovered-after-77-years/ The wreckage of a WWII submarine that was built in Barrow was discovered after 77 years. The U-class submarine HMS Urge went missing in 1942 after apparently striking an enemy minefield. However, almost 80 years later, the ship was located on the Mediterranean seabed off Malta by a marine archeology team. HMS Urge was built […]]]>

The wreckage of a WWII submarine that was built in Barrow was discovered after 77 years.

The U-class submarine HMS Urge went missing in 1942 after apparently striking an enemy minefield.

However, almost 80 years later, the ship was located on the Mediterranean seabed off Malta by a marine archeology team.

HMS Urge was built by Vickers Armstrong at Barrow and first landed on October 30, 1939.

It was commissioned in December 1940 and had been financed by funds raised by the people of Bridgend in South Wales.

The U-class submarine left Malta for the northern coast of Egypt on April 27, 1942 but never reached its rendezvous in Alexandria on May 6.

The submarine was one of 19 U-class ships sunk during World War II.

Her crew of 32 included Leading Seaman Jesse Norris, of Rochester, and Chief Telegraph Operator Roy Rogers, of Whitstable.

There were also 11 Royal Navy passengers and a journalist on board.

The fate of HMS Urge remained a mystery until a team from the University of Malta discovered the wreckage of the submarine two miles off the coast of the island.

The discovery came after Francis Dickinson, the grandson of the submarine captain, asked the varsity team to search for an area that had been heavily mined during World War II.

Professor Timothy Gambin, who led the team, told PBS Malta that the damage to the submarine indicated that a “very violent explosion” had taken place.

He said: “The damage to the bow shows a very violent explosion, indicating that the ship would have sunk very quickly, leaving no chance for anyone to survive this tragedy.

“Besides the damage to the bow, the wreckage is in absolutely fantastic condition.

“He sits upright on the seabed, very proud, in the direction he was ordered to take on his way to Alexandria.”

In 2015, a Belgian diver claimed to have found the wreckage of the submarine off the Libyan coast, but it was not HMS Urge.

During his short career he had a number of successes, most notably the sinking of an Italian cruiser earlier in 1942.

A ceremony is planned for 2020 to declare the site an official war grave.

It is hoped that the daughter of the captain of HMS Urge will be present.


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